Sunday, October 15, 2017

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Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Flags and anthems are symbols of idol-worship - The-State-As-GOD. Flags are holdover symbols of blood thirsty FRATRICIDAL aristocrats

Flags and anthems are symbols of idol-worship - The-State-As-GOD.
Flags are holdover symbols of blood thirsty FRATRICIDAL aristocrats - sure to kill the brother you kill. -Kwasi sophic #kneeling #anthemprotest


Flags and anthems are symbols of idol-worship - The-State-As-GOD. Flags are holdover symbols of blood thirsty FRATRICIDAL aristocrats http://j.mp/2yBzQO2

Saturday, September 16, 2017

What Men Should Know About Prostate Cancer

What MEN Should Know About Prostate Cancer, AND, African American men are 2.5 times more likely to die from the disease


September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and Chesapeake Urology is urging men to take charge of their prostate health this month, and throughout the year. Chesapeake Urology is committed to finding a cure for this disease. In fact, for more than a decade, Chesapeake Urology's signature cause has been ending prostate cancer through the ZERO Prostate Cancer Challenge/Baltimore. Since the event began in 2006, Chesapeake Urology has raised more than $3.5 million to fund free prostate cancer screenings for more than 8,000 Maryland men, fully endow a prostate cancer research scholarship, and for advocacy and patient assistance programs. CONTINUE






Friday, September 15, 2017

Listen to Celia Lloyd discuss the impact of mentoring, empowering, and inspiring students in higher education

Celia Lloyd, a higher education strategist and change leader, has worked at the City College of New York (CCNY) for approximately 18 years. During her tenure she has held several leadership roles. Celia has served as a member of the College’s Strategic Planning Committees and the Middle States Committee. Nationally, Celia served on several committees of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO). A key leader, she has participated in CUNY’s Executive Leadership Development Program and the Harvard University Management Development Program.

In her multiple capacities at CUNY over her tenure there, she’s served as the Senior Registrar, Director of Student Information Systems, Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management, and Assistant Vice President for PeopleSoft/CUNYfirst Integration.

Prior to joining CCNY, Celia worked as Academic Services Manager at the University of the Virgin Islands, St. Croix Campus, where she oversaw aspects of enrollment management activities, including admissions, registration services, and graduation. She also became involved in other aspects of life on the island serving as an Emergency Services Coordinator for the Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency (V.I.T.E.M.A.). Before joining the University of the Virgin Islands team Celia worked as an educational professional at Queens College/CUNY.

Celia’s passion is mentoring and empowering others. She strongly believes in helping individuals achieve their highest potential, and leverages her experiences to maximize talent -- an essential attribute that allows her to build strong dynamic teams. Celia developed and led a Leadership Development Program at City College for staff members. More recently, Celia has expanded her mentorship to female students in community college by becoming an active mentor in the Women of GRIT Program at Guttman Community College/CUNY. She believes that providing mentorship to underserved students is critical to access and retention. In addition to these roles across the University, Celia has served as a Member of the Church Council (Board of Deacons and Trustees) of the Riverside Church, as well as Chair of the Membership and Parish Life Commission.

Listen to Celia discuss the impact of mentoring, empowering, and inspiring students in higher education at the links above and below. She can also be contacted through her email atcpatlloyd@hotmail.com and visit her LinkedIn page here.

 
 
Listen Now! E2E Podcast - Celia Lloyd

Let's educate, empower, enrich together!




Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Hetty "The Professorial" Fox, On the Octogenarian Occasion of her Eightieth Birthday – September 13, 2017


HETTY: THE PROFESSORIAL FOX
(On the Octogenarian Occasion of her Eightieth Birthday – September 13, 2017)


By
George Edward Tait

Forty years ago she told me
“Afrika is in your foot.”
This lady from Lyman Place –
Her brain bursting through Bronx banalities and bureaucracies;
Her consciousness confronting corporate catatonia and coma-toxicity
Her spirit spiraling from steps of Shepp-skins to solar-posiums
This lady from Lyman Place – A neo-presearcher Nubian precursor
Generational genius and gateway guru of her Neo-Presearch Energy Institute
Charged with chartered charm for chaperoned children – Happy Birthday!

© 2017



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Author Debra Chidakwa-akue’s “The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe” Reveals the Ability of the Heart to Endure the Most Horrific of Circumstance and Heal


“The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe” from Christian Faith Publishing author Debra Chidakwa-Akue recounts the author’s struggle to survive Zimbabwe’s war for independence. Through her journey, she reveals the power of the human spirit and heart to endure in the most horrific of circumstances.

“The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe”: a war story of tremendous encouragement, inspiration, sadness, and thought-provoking encounters. “The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe” is the creation of published author, Debra Chidakwa-Akue. Debra Mina Chidakwa-Akue was born in Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe, then immigrated to the United Kingdom as a young girl. She has lived in the United Kingdom for most of her life. Today, she is happily married and resides in the USA with her husband and family. Debra is an ordained minister in the Methodist Church. Debra has a legal background and serves as a community developer as well as a representative for women’s rights and children. Debra is a relentless warrior, dignified woman, joyous individual, who loves a good laugh, and a wonderful cook.
“’The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe’ reveals the hidden agendas and real life stories that human beings experience, which is sometimes impossible to talk about. ‘The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe’ brings into the open the realities of life through the life and experiences of this brave young African girl. It will leave you with a challenge to take control of your life, to do something positive, and to see other human beings with fresher eyes. It will make you laugh, cry, and celebrate life and uplift you as well give you hope and be thankful. It is a story that is difficult to put down as it takes you on journey that is full of adventure and real life experiences, and, in the end, strengthens your faith or leads you to it.” -- Debra Chidakwa-Akue
Published by Christian Faith Publishing, Debra Chidakwa-Akue’s new book is a story of a young girl who endured the horrors of war.
In December of 1966, a baby girl was born in the forests of central Zimbabwe. Seventeen years later, she sat alone on a cold concrete floor at Gatwick arrivals. Lost and afraid, she had been abandoned by the country she fought for. “The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe” is the heart-rending story of Debra Mina Chidakwa-Akue, her early life of abuse, slavery, war, and betrayal.
Set during the years of Zimbabwe’s long and bloody struggle for independence, Debra’s journey shines a harrowing light on life in her country. “The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe” demonstrates how power corrupts and sparks conflict while revealing the horrors the human spirit can endure. Author Debra Chidakwa-Akue opens her heart to share a journey of a thousand miles filled with pain, heartache, near-death experiences, abuse, and the bitterness of Zimbabwe’s war for independence.
View a synopsis of “The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe” on YouTube.
Consumers can purchase “The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe” at traditional brick & mortar bookstores, or online at Amazon.com, Apple iTunes store, Kobo or Barnes and Noble.
For additional information or inquiries about “The Forgotten Child of Zimbabwe”, contact the Christian Faith Publishing media department at 866-554-0919.

(PRWEB) 
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Thursday, September 7, 2017

The N-Word's Multi-Layered Power Structure

What is the global impact of the n-word on a people's image? Who has the most impact on how that image is presented? Is it the artists? Is it the music label and the decisions made by the label executives? Is it the communications executives and what the program directors are allowed to dictate to radio executives and DJs to promote?

Do parents and educators play a role in that image being marketed? Do they allow the image to go global by inaction? Are parents and educators silently complicit by what they don't do?

Who decides what artists get prominent play? Who decides what music will be played on the radio? Do DJs have any real say at all these days?

What role do Sony Music Entertainment, Universal Music Group and , Warner Music Group play?

What role do Emmis Communications and iHeart Media play?

What role do artists play?

What role do we play as individuals, parents, educators, professionals, managers, executives, unemployed, underemployed, etc.? When is it time for us to do better and make choices that reflect our RESPONSIBILITY to our youth and what they're exposed to?

See the message below from Kanye, Jay-Z, Drake, Nikki Minaj, Lil Wayne, Rick Ross; the Sony, Universal, and Warner record label executives; and the Emmis Communications and iHeart Media executives. What are they telling us? What are we going to do about it? What are yougoing to do about it?
 

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Zika in Puerto Rico and government lies - women and children caught in the middle of a crisis





A mother cradles her infant who was born with a microephaly as noted by the abnormally small and creased skull. Photo credit:Ricardo Moraes/Reuters.

RADICAL WOMEN

Zika, birth defects, and government lies

In Puerto Rico, women and children caught in the middle of a crisis

Margaret Viggiani
August 2017

In April 2017, Puerto Rican officials declared the Zika epidemic over. Furthermore, they claim of the 3,678 pregnant women infected with the virus, only 35 babies have been reported with Zika-related birth defects, or about 1 percent. It appears, at first blush, quite good news.

But probe a bit deeper and things just don’t add up. These reported figures are far below the average of other countries. They have Zika-related health issues in newborns at a rate of 5 percent.

What’s clear is that the Puerto Rican government initially underreported the problem. Possibly to help kick start the tourist industry, which accounts for 6-7 percent of the national economy.

Unfortunately, the one-two punch of economic recession and Zika epidemic has had devastating consequences. As with all crises, economic or medical, it’s the women and children who are in the crosshairs.

ABCs of Zika. The virus initially showed up in Uganda and Tanzania 50 years ago and has since moved across parts of Africa, Asia and Indonesia. The disease recently jumped the ocean to Latin America, the Caribbean and the United States.

It is carried by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and has the unique characteristic that it is also transmitted sexually. Until a vaccine or cure is approved, the only way to stop the spread of the disease is to eliminate the carrier insects and promote safe-sex practices such as male and female condoms. Religious objections, particularly from the Catholic Church, to family planning and abortion has helped spread the infection in Latin America and the Caribbean.

In Puerto Rico, El Salvador, and parts of Brazil, women have been diagnosed at a much higher rate than men. It’s possible that more females get tested for fear of the virus’ effects on pregnancy. Regardless, women make up the majority of known victims.

About 80 percent of those infected with Zika have mild, if any, symptoms — a rash, slight fever, joint aches and not much else. A few have profound illness, including paralysis. The biggest threat is to pregnant women who contract the virus. They have a 5 percent chance of miscarrying or brain-related birth defects. Many of the afflicted babies suffer from microcephaly which causes small heads and calcium deposits on the brain that affect hearing, eyesight and overall development.

In Puerto Rico there is a legitimate question whether the children born with microcephaly and other problems are acknowledged, but not officially reported, or if the mothers are not told of the diagnosis. Either scenario is a gross abuse of public trust.

Women and children last. Early detection and intervention is key. Babies with microcephaly should be evaluated by a pediatric neurologist and followed by a medical management team. Early intervention programs that involve physical, speech, and occupational therapists will help maximize abilities and minimize dysfunction. And medications can help control seizures and neuromuscular symptoms.

But let’s be real. The public healthcare system in Puerto Rico was gutted and privatized in the early ’90s, making quality medical care unavailable to the nearly half of the island’s populace that lives in poverty. Added to lack of access is the exorbitant cost of caring for children with brain damage. Estimates indicate it will average $4 million over the life of the child. Where is that money to come from? How are families supposed to cope?

As can be expected under capitalism, which always places profit over people, women bear the brunt of the burden. A lack of accessible and affordable medical care, including birth control and condoms, means unplanned pregnancies and poor pre-natal care. While abortion is legal in Puerto Rico the high cost can be prohibitive. And the lack of medical specialists — many leave the island for the United States to make a living — means there are fewer doctors available who can treat these children with special needs.

As one mom of a baby girl born with microcephaly said, “I just want her to be okay.” If only wishes could make the damage of a ravaged brain disappear. Unfortunately, they won’t. What is needed are services to assist these parents to provide for their families.

But it’s not coming from the tied-to-Uncle-Sam purse strings of this tiny island territory. The local politicians will cut just about anything to keep U.S. financial interests appeased (for more info, see FS article online, “In Puerto Rico, colonialism is alive and well”). Would they also falsify Zika numbers? It seems entirely plausible.

As a colony of the USA, Puerto Rico has been for decades an all-you-can-take buffet for Wall Street. Thanks to austerity measures forced on the island, since 2006, over 7 percent of workers have lost their jobs and 8.6 percent have left their homeland.

This is the human cost of over a decade of depression and debt crisis which was caused by U.S. policies, and fully endorsed by island politicos.

The women of Puerto Rico have long been treated like a disposable commodity. In the 20th century they were forcibly sterilized, often without knowledge or permission. At one point they were 10 times more likely to be sterilized than women on the mainland USA. Today it appears Puerto Rican women are being kept ill-informed about potential pregnancy complications, and are certainly economically unable to deal with the ravages of Zika birth defects.

It’s an old and unforgivable story. Women on the island, and everywhere, have the right to self-determination, including deciding when and if to have children.

• Tax the rich and large corporations to fully fund healthcare in Puerto Rico and the U.S.
• Guarantee early screening and all needed services for families dealing with Zika birth defects.
• Self-determination for Puerto Rico; cancel the debt.

Send your thoughts to FSnews@mindspring.com.

Click here to see the current Freedom Socialist. To subscribe to the FS by postal mail, email, or audio CD, visit here or send $10 for one year or $17 for two to Freedom Socialist, 5018 Rainier Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98118.

(Students $8 for one year, strikers and unemployed $5.)

You can find fiery Radical Women writings on the RW webpage. Learn more about RW through The Radical Women Manifesto, an exhilarating exploration of Marxist feminist theory and organizing methods. Buy a copy or read it on Google Books.Donations are appreciated! As a grassroots group, Radical Women is sustained by support from people like you. Please contribute online or mail a check, payable to Radical Women, National Office 5018 Rainier Ave S Seattle, WA 98118 USA.

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Phone: 206-722-6057
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Thursday, August 24, 2017

African Animation: Banji Versus The Village storybook is moving forward into animation

The children’s storybook, Banji Versus The Village, is progressing into animation. It is a lush paperback and ebook written and illustrated by U.S. based Nigerian animator, Bankole Lasekan. The book is quite distinctive in narrative and visual storytelling, which embraces an African traditional style and motifs. In this interview, Bankole discussed his latest project.
Q: What’s the story about?
A: It is about a 7-year-old boy and his baby hippo friend, and their “creative solutions” around the village, which the village often finds challenging.
Q: Why initially a book and not straight into animation?
A: I originally conceived it as a TV series. Nonetheless, early feedback indicated the script and design elements would be great also in storybook format. So, they were developed simultaneously.
Q: How long did the book take?
A: Being a one-man project, it took about a year; particularly due to the 3D modeling, texturing and rigging of the characters, and the myriad set elements. Though, these assets will also go into the animation.
Q: Could you tell us a bit about your animation background?
A: I studied Design Communication and Film/Animation back in college. I was eventually fortunate to gain employment with Pixar long ago, where I picked up a lot about the art form from those great guys. I was an animator on A Bug’s Life and the Oscar-winning Geri’s Game. I further worked at Electronic Arts in L.A. and some other local studios. I eventually started a small studio in Nigeria, focusing on TV commercials, ad concepts and graphics.
Q: Overall, what do you hope this project accomplishes?
A: For one thing, the book has good instructional value, and is a gainful addition to the larger efforts encouraging youth literacy. The content is as motivational as it is fun and entertaining. We expect the animated series as well to be of extensive value in an environment where nearly all animated TV programing is foreign. I also hope to use the opportunity to teach and mentor some Nigerian/African young folks who had earlier requested animation training opportunities.
Q: Are you working with any major studio on the project?
A: Not currently. We are still working independently. Inquiries are however welcomed.

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Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Africa's Space sector will gather for The African Space Generation Workshop in Akure, Nigeria this November

Africa’s First Space Generation Workshop Coming to Nigeria

The space sector represents a vital enabler for Africa. This November the region's leading young space professionals will gather for a collaborative workshop in Akure, Nigeria to strengthen networks and stimulate communication about addressing key questions being faced by Africa's space community. Topics to include how space technology and its services foster socioeconomic development for the region through space sciences, navigation/positioning, earth observation, and satellite communication
Lagos, Nigeria, August 19, 2017 --(PR.com)-- The planning of the first African Space Generation Workshop (AF-SGW) is underway by the (SGAC) in support of the, United Nations Programme on Space Applications.

This two-day regional workshop for students and young professionals in the African region represents an unparalleled collaborative effort, and will be held on 16-17 November 2017 in Akure City, Nigeria hosted by the Centre for Space Research and Applications, of the Federal University of Technology.

The objective of the AF-SGW is as follows:

* To strengthen the regional network of the students and young professionals in the African region

* To examine and consider key questions in Africa region that the regional space community is facing and to provide inputs from the next generation of the space professionals

* To allow tomorrow’s space sector leaders in the Africa region to have the opportunity to interact with today’s space leaders and professionals in the region.

The workshop will have up to 100 African delegates between 18 and 35 years old, focusing on university students and young professionals working in the African space sector to accomplish a series of common objectives. These include the strengthening of the regional network and providing means of effective communications amongst today’s space leaders of the region. Planned activities will further hope to examine and consider key questions in Africa that the regional space community is facing and to provide inputs from the next generation of the space professionals.

The space sector represents a vital enabler for African’s students and young professionals. Space investments offer services for the region in the growth of health, education, construction, land and resource management, agricultural, and environmental sectors. The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs encourages the use of space services to assist towards the achievement of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Such uses include the surveying of crops, disaster response capabilities, and the monitoring of climate change. For example, high-resolution satellite imagery has been integrated with machine learning at Stanford University to provide estimates of where impoverished populations reside in certain African regions.

Space technology and its services offer means of crucial socioeconomic development for the region. This includes space sciences, navigation and position, earth observation, and satellite communication. The African Union is aware of such opportunities to address its challenges, and acknowledges regional projects and organizations such as the African Leadership Conference, the Regional African Satellite Communications Organisation the multilateral African Resource Management Satellite Constellation program. Furthermore, Union Heads of State and Government adopted the African Space Policy and Strategy during the 26th Ordinary Session in January of 2016, in efforts of establishing an African Outer Space Programme.

A lack of significant funding has been a challenge for the region’s space industry. As a result, funds have primarily been used to develop miniaturized satellites for space research, including those from South Africa and Nigeria. In 2013, South Africa become the first African country to launch its own CubeSat (TshepisoSAT), followed by another (ZA-AeroSat) in April, 2017. Kenya’s University of Nairobi is also actively developing a CubeSat project for the monitoring of coastal areas and agricultural regions. Nigeria and Ghana have also launched such satellites in cooperation with Bangladesh, Japan, and Mongolia as part of the cross-border interdisciplinary Joint Global Multi-Nation Birds Satellite project. As Nigeria will be the host location for the workshop, it is also a leader in the region’s space sector. The country’s National Space Research and Development Agency was established in 1999 and is mandated to pursue the attainment of space capabilities.

The Space Generation Advisory Council provides international connections, while enhancing regional cooperation and coordination amongst the younger generation. The AF-SGW represents an integral opportunity for young African space professionals to establish meaningful cooperation intentions from the ground up. This is the one body that will make the difference in the continent.

1st African Regional Space Generation Workshop (AF-SGW 2017)
Clementine Decoopman
+43 1718 11 1830
Contact
http://www.spacegeneration.org/event/af-sgw-2017-home
Executive Director – Space Generation Advisory Council


Ghana Launches Its First Satellite As Part of A New Era of African Space Exploration http://j.mp/2v5C6eT 
Going to the moon? What Africa is doing to put its man or cat into space, and how you can help http://j.mp/2w2Ln4x 

The Pan African University Institute for Space Sciences to be hosted in South Africa, enrollment January 2016 http://j.mp/2wEw3h6