Monday, August 13, 2018

The words black and white when use to refer to a person leave me nauseous.


The words black and white when use to refer to a person leave me nauseous.

I will NEVER use the words black or white when referring to a person.




Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Project21 offers Proposals, a Blueprint, to substantially mend the rift between black Americans and law enforcement

Black Leaders Urge Reduced Police Role in Regulatory Enforcement, Increased Autism Training and Gun Legalization to Improve Community-Police Relations


To improve community-police relations, police should get out of the regulation business, be given greater training in identifying and dealing with those with autism and other cognitive disabilities, build stronger bonds with the communities they serve by offering gun safety training and be given greater recognition for the good deeds they do. These innovative policy proposals and more are being offered by the Project 21 black leadership network as part of its "Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America."
Tens of thousands of police officers from across the nation are gathering in Washington, D.C. to commemorate Peace Officers Memorial Day on May 15 and to celebrate National Police Week. Project 21, which is unveiling its Blueprint in its entirety over the next several weeks, views this week's events as a perfect time to address and discuss means for promoting stronger bonds between law enforcement and the black communities it serves. 

Black confidence in policing has decreased due to a series of high-profile black fatalities involving officers in recent years. Some of these fatalities occurred while police were enforcing relatively minor infractions. Project 21 contends that involving police in the enforcement of regulations or minor infractions with little relevance to improving public safety needlessly increases the risk mistakes will be made. Its Blueprint suggests defunding federal police powers at regulatory agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency and Internal Revenue Service. Those dollars can instead help citizens learn more about gun use and safety from local police and fund training about dealing with people with cognitive disabilities. Project 21 also asks for increased community engagement, such as religious institutions highlighting first responders at special services and a new community-recommended presidential award for exemplary police service.

"Proposals offered in Project 21's Blueprint can substantially mend the rift between black Americans and law enforcement," said Project 21 Co-Chairman Council Nedd II, a Pennsylvania state constable and Anglican archbishop. "Politicians and bureaucrats have inflicted mission creep on officers that hurts their standing in the black community. Project 21 suggests reining in that overreach, working with communities to highlight the value of good policing and keeping situations from unnecessarily escalating."

Nedd – "America's Constable" – authored a commentary, to be posted today by the Daily Caller, in which he describes law enforcement careers and the dangerous uncertainties faced regularly by police.

Last month, Nedd and other Project 21 leaders began briefing key staff at the White House and with congressional leadership about the 57 policy ideas – spread out over 10 subject areas and covering education, criminal justice, economics and more – that are available in its "Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America."

There are eight specific proposals to offer a "better deal" in public safety and community-police relations:
  • End police enforcement of regulations such as smoking bans and childrens' lemonade stands as well as any unnecessary focus on minor infractions that can escalate into major incidents.
  • Provide officers with special training to identify and handle people with autism, Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive disabilities, because people with those disabilities can respond unpredictably – and incidents have resulted in inappropriate police responses.
  • Increase use of body cameras by officers.
  • Prevent "SWATting" to remove the threat of civilians incurring physical harm and property damage when police departments are pranked into mistakenly dispatching tactical units when no threat exists.
  • Disarm federal agencies lacking direct law enforcement responsibilities and redirect those funds to local departments for community-relations efforts.
  • Lift restrictions on civilian gun ownership and give local police responsibilities in teaching gun safety to the public.
  • Encourage local houses of worship to sponsor "First Responder Sundays" in which police, fire and rescue personnel attend in uniform and programming is geared toward strengthening community ties to them.
  • Establish a "Presidential Medal for Exemplary Law Enforcement," based on community recommendations, to honor acts of extreme kindness, compassion and service by first responders.
"Most agree our justice system desperately needs repair. Too many families are torn apart because minor infractions have escalated into major crises," said Project 21 member Derrick Hollie, the president of Reaching America. "More training, more compassion and better understanding and respect between police officers and the communities they serve will help reduce arrests and incarceration for many low-income and minority individuals. The respect, however, must be reciprocal."

"I'm excited about the forward-thinking nature of the proposals set forth in the Blueprint. Project 21 hits the mark in addressing important issues to improve police-community relations," said Project 21 member Richard Holt, a political consultant. "By making sure officers are doing the most important work, things are kept in perspective as communities are protected. This means not stopping somebody for just a broken tail light, or going a few miles over the speed limit." 

Each Monday between now and July 7, Project 21 will release reform recommendations from its "Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America" covering a specific subject area. The tentative release schedule is as follows:
  • Improving Higher Education (May 21) 
  • Reforming the Criminal Justice System (May 29 –Tuesday)
  • Reducing Economic Harm of Excise Taxes (June 4)
  • Promoting K-12 Educational Choice (June 11)
  • Strengthening Faith-Based Communities (June 18)
  • Stopping Wealth Transfer from the Poor to Non-Citizens (June 25)
  • Promoting Self-Determination (July 2)
  • Ending Excessive Regulation (July 9)
Project 21, a leading voice of black conservatives for over 25 years, is sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research. Its members have been quoted, interviewed or published over 40,000 times since the program was created in 1992. Contributions to the National Center are tax-deductible and greatly appreciated, and may be earmarked exclusively for the use of Project 21.

Founded in 1982, the National Center for Public Policy Research is a non-partisan, free-market, independent conservative think-tank. Ninety-four percent of its support comes from some 60,000 individuals, less than four percent from foundations and less than two percent from corporations. Sign up for email updates here.

Follow Project 21 on Twitter at @Project21News or general announcements. To be alerted to upcoming media appearances by Project 21 members, follow our media appearances Twitter account at @NCPPRMedia.





The National Center for Public Policy Research
E-Mail: info@nationalcenter.org
Web: www.nationalcenter.org






Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Black Leaders Demanded A Better Deal for Black Employment - Project 21 Calls for Repeal of Discriminatory Laws Hindering Black Economic Prosperity



 Jim Crow-era regulations created for the express purpose of denying blacks economic opportunity are still on the books and must be repealed to promote black prosperity, according to the Project 21 black leadership network in its forthcoming "Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America."


Recommendations in Project 21's Blueprint meant to encourage employment opportunities for black communities are being released just after the U.S. Department of Labor' Bureau of Labor Statistics announced its April jobs report.

While the latest jobs report indicates that the overall black unemployment rate is at an all-time low (6.6 percent in April, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics), it remains above the overall unemployment rate of 3.9 percent. There is also a three-point disparity between overall black and white unemployment, and black teen unemployment is an unacceptably high 29 percent.

Employment policy proposals found in Project 21's dynamic new Blueprint aim to enhance the competitiveness of black workers and the marketability of unskilled, at-risk youth.
In seeking improved black employment figures, Project 21 calls for a repeal of the 1931 Davis-Bacon Act in its Blueprint. It notes that the Davis-Bacon Act, which requires contractors to pay "prevailing wages" for most federal construction projects, was originally designed to prevent non-union blacks from competing with white union workers and "continues to serve its original purpose" today.

Project 21's Blueprint also calls for reducing or eliminating the minimum wage in special low-income zip codes. Like the Davis-Bacon Act, the federal minimum wage law was originally designed to deny blacks opportunity. It was first included in the 1933 National Recovery Act (NRA) during the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt. It was derided by black leaders at the time as the "Negro Removal Act."

"The most effective means of ending race divisions in America is to have a robust growing economy – one that allows all Americans to have a taste of the American Dream," said Project 21 Co-Chairman Horace Cooper, the former chief of staff of the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment Standards Administration. "There has been record progress for blacks under the Trump Administration, but there is so much more potential in the free market. Solutions that build on the private sector will be more significant and more enduring."
In late April, Project 21 leaders began briefing key staff at the White House and in congressional leadership about the 57 policy ideas – spread out over 10 subject areas and covering education, criminal justice, economics and more – found in its "Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America."

There are five specific proposals for a better deal in employment policy for black Americans that create incentives and remove barriers to work:
  • Improving welfare reform, including more work requirements for eligibility in programs such as the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP, or food stamps), in recognition of past success in reducing the number of people requiring government assistance.
  • Repealing the Davis-Bacon Act – the Jim Crow-era regulation essentially requiring union wages for most federal contracting – that can hurt small minority-owned businesses and lower-skilled, non-union minority workers.
  • Allowing employers in special low-income zip codes to not pay Social Security and Medicare taxes for school-age employees under 22 years old.
  • Exempting employers in special low-income zip codes from minimum wage laws so they can hire workers at a discounted wage.
  • Analyzing the impact of new federal regulations on the hiring of young, low-skilled workers, and requiring congressional approval for all regulations that cannot be modified to mitigate negative impacts.
"Project 21's 'Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America' can help President Trump fulfill his promise to help black communities. It lays out a comprehensive agenda for reducing, discouraging and eliminating restrictions that make black workers less attractive to prospective employers," said Project 21 member Derryck Green, who has authored a monthly jobs-related economic analysis for Project 21. "Giving employers greater ability to set wages, to make them proportionate to applicants' experience and skillsets, would certainly help in economic deserts where people most need jobs but often lack the skills and experience necessary to be competitive."

"As the owner of a small construction-related business for over two decades, I have personally seen the positive effects new jobs bring to economically depressed communities," added Project 21 member Kevin Martin, a U.S. Navy veteran whose company specializes in environmental remediation. "As the one doing the hiring, I have been proud to bring aboard unskilled workers who learned a trade and eventually moved on to bigger and better jobs. It's like the old biblical maxim about giving a man a fish – one will feed him for a day, but teaching him to fish provides him with a bounty that shall be limitless!"

Cooper added: "There's nothing like the independence you get from a good high-paying job. Instead of trying to divide the pie along racial lines, let's make sure there's so much pie that everyone gets what they want."

Each Monday between now and July 7, Project 21 will release reform recommendations from its "Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America" covering a specific subject area. The tentative release schedule is as follows:
  • Improving Relationships Between Police and Black Communities (May 14)
  • Improving Higher Education (May 21)
  • Reforming the Criminal Justice System (May 29 –Tuesday)
  • Reducing Economic Harm of Excise Taxes (June 4)
  • Promoting K-12 Educational Choice (June 11)
  • Strengthening Faith-Based Communities (June 18)
  • Stopping Wealth Transfer from the Poor to Non-Citizens (June 25)
  • Promoting Self-Determination (July 2)
  • Ending Excessive Regulation (July 9)
Project 21, a leading voice of black conservatives for over 25 years, is sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research. Its members have been quoted, interviewed or published over 40,000 times since the program was created in 1992. Contributions to the National Center are tax-deductible and greatly appreciated, and may be earmarked exclusively for the use of Project 21.

Founded in 1982, the National Center for Public Policy Research is a non-partisan, free-market, independent conservative think-tank. Ninety-four percent of its support comes from some 60,000 individuals, less than four percent from foundations and less than two percent from corporations. Sign up for email updates here.










Follow Project 21 on Twitter at @Project21News for general announcements. To be alerted to upcoming media appearances by Project 21 members, follow our media appearances Twitter account at @NCPPRMedia.




Monday, April 30, 2018

"A Reason For Living": An explosive historical novel set in Jamaica, of love sex culture and revolution


In the 1960s, the little country of Jamaica gained independence from England, and begun discarding over 400 years of Spanish and British domination, racism and classism; and unleashing some of the greatest creative talents in music, sports, dance, and intellectual applications.

Julian Jingles, rude boy writer, working at the at Gleaner Company in Kingston, Jamaica circa 1970, two years after writing his novel.


A Reason For Living, a first novel written mostly between 1966 to 1968, by teenage Jamaican writer, Julian Jingles, captures this unique period in Jamaica's history. He has established careers, spanning five decades, as a journalist, documentary filmmaker, and entrepreneur, in America and Jamaica.
Jamaica's cultural genius has given the world five genres of popular music; Ska, Rocksteady, Reggae, Dub, and Dancehall. Talented personalities emerged mainly in sports and music to garner world attention, such as George Kerr, Collie Smith, Lenox "Billy" Miller, Allan "Skill" Cole, Donald Quarrie, Merlene Ottey, Harry Belafonte, Millie Small, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Toots and the Maytals, Jimmy Cliff, The Skatalites, Monty Alexander, Rico Rodriguez, Ernest Ranglin, Clement "Coxsone" Dodd, Cecil "Prince Buster" Campbell, Arthur "Duke" Reid, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Chris Blackwell, Rex Nettleford, Madge Sinclair, and in international politics Michael Manley, and many others.
But alongside these achievements existed deep, widespread social and economic discontent, fueling violence; pitting segments of the suffering masses against each other, ignorantly and arrogantly perpetrating partisan politics, and vying criminals against the police.  
The novel profoundly captures these troubled but phenomenally creative times, when the "rude boys" emerged, expressing anti-state, anti-social,  rebellious lifestyles, identifiable with young males living throughout the capital city Kingston. Gangs namely Phantom, Mau Mau, Pigeon, Skull, Spanglers, Idaho, Untouchables, Spoilers, Vikings, Hot Steppers, Shower Posse, and Phoenix drove fear into many Kingstonians, battling each other, protecting turfs and invading others.
A Reason For Living delves into love, sex, music and sports, and the roles of Rastafari, and the American Civil Rights and Black Power movements that impacted Jamaica. It tells the story of a physically beautiful country, of warm, humorous, enterprising, and crafty people with the urge to succeed, fighting against inequality, injustice, prejudice, and discrimination. It's the story of a revolution that could have happened in Jamaica. Every page grabs you.
Available at amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com, iUniverse.com, and bookstores.

SOURCE Julian Jingles





NEW YORK, Jan. 24, 2018 /PRNewswire/ --






Saturday, April 28, 2018

The GroovaLottos Form Down Streeters, LLC Offering Artist Development Services

Members of Grammy nominated band and self-contained songwriting and production unit,

The GroovaLottos have formed a company for artist development, and production services.
Labels, managers and artists looking to take their careers to the next level now have an option for a high quality product by working with Down Streeters, LLC. The company, formed by Eddie Ray Johnson and Mwalim DaPhunkee Professor of The GroovaLottos offer music production services in the all genres of rock, soul, hip-hop, blues, jazz and funk. With over 70 combined years of experiences in all genres of music, Down Streeters, LLC is a powerhouse for the music industry.

Receiving 4 Grammy nominations for their debut album, "Ask Yo' Mama" where Mwalim and Eddie Ray served as producers, as well as international attention for their production work on the Soul Poet's Syndicate single "Flippin", which included 5 remixes, they are opening up their services to independent artists, labels and management companies in need of artist development services.

"There are so many talented young artists in need of direction; as well as seasoned artists in need of an updated mature sound. We've got something for all of them to shine," explained Eddie Ray Johnson. Artist Development services include vocal coaching, song development, production services, and performance development.

Artists currently on their roster include soul-funk-blues band, The GroovaLottos; Hip-hop Jazz artist, The ZYG 808; soul singer and songwriter, Phillip Aaron; and soul singer, Anamuna.

For more info, visit:
https://www.thegroovalottos.com/down-streeters/




Black Activists: Starbucks Shutdown Prompts Concern That "Racial Bias Training" Programs Actually Violate Civil Rights


Black Activists Want Government to Investigate Employer-Mandated "Implicit Bias" Workshops.

Posted by TheBlackList-Publisher  April 26, 2018 at 9:24am View Blog

Starbucks Shutdown Prompts Concern That "Racial Bias Training" Programs Actually Violate Civil Rights.

Non-Minority and Male Employees Could Be Disadvantaged.

Washington, DC - With the Starbucks chain of coffeehouses planning to shutter over 8,000 locations on May 29 to train approximately 175,000 members of its workforce on issues of alleged "implicit bias" and "promot[ing] conscious inclusion," the Project 21 black leadership network has asked the federal government to look into whether blanket assumptions by an employer in such situations constitute a violation of employees' civil rights.

"Not only does implicit bias training on the part of employers eat up valuable time that could be spent training employees on safety, teamwork and building morale, the targeting associated with bias training is divisive," said Project 21 Co-Chairman Stacy Washington. "When employees are trained to focus on their differences, the camaraderie necessary to work together is destroyed. Mistrust in fellow coworkers is sown, and those the training is intended to help are actually harmed in the long run. Employees should not be forced to utilize methods that have no track record of success."

On April 23, Project 21 Co-Chairman Horace Cooper signed letters that were sent to Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division Joh... at the U.S. Department of Justice and Acting Chairman Victoria Lipnic of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The letters questioned the "troubling" implications of "workplace practices focusing on 'implicit' or 'unconscious' bias." In particular, Project 21 asked if such behavior violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This provision prohibits discrimination based on sex, race, color, national origin and religion. 

The letter noted:

Employers are increasingly adopting so-called "implicit bias" training, which targets employees by race or gender. Not only are the tests associated with unconscious bias well short of meeting scientific standards, but – because they purport to aid employers in targeting employees primarily based on their race or ethnicity and/or their gender – they potentially allow employees to be assessed, disciplined or promoted on the basis of race or gender activity which Title VII specifically bars. Whether based on good intentions or not, an employer's plan to hire, promote or advance employees who are minority and/or female using implicit bias as a motive disadvantages non-minority and male employees.

The letter further stated that Project 21 "believe[s] that this employment technique is a violation" of civil rights law, and that the federal government has cause to investigate if "implicit bias" programs conflict with Title VII protections. CONTINUE FOR MORE



Sunday, April 1, 2018

Take A Stand Against Amputation: Raising Awareness About a Potentially Life-Threatening Disease With Worse Outcomes for Minorities


Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is the biggest disease that most people have never heard about. Up to a staggering 18 million Americans1 suffer from PAD, a potentially life-threatening disease. Early detection is key to treating this condition where plaque builds up along blood vessel walls, narrowing the arteries and reducing blood flow to the legs and feet.
There are more than 160,000 PAD-related amputations in the U.S. each year, so when left untreated, PAD can lead to amputation.2 And the rate of amputation for African-American and Hispanic-Americans with PAD is higher than for white Americans.
  •     African-Americans are twice as likely to be amputated as a result of advanced PAD as Caucasians.3
  •     Hispanics receive an amputation for PAD at a rate 50 percent higher than Caucasians.3



Sunday, March 25, 2018

Conversations for the definitive African mind



Below are some of the conversation you missed on TheBlackList Pub:

Cuban made medication to prevent diabetic foot amputation, heading for the USA

HAVANA TIMES – Cuban and US companies have signed an agreement to apply the Cuban product Heberprot-P in the United States, which reduces the risk of amputation due to diabetic foot ulcers, local media reported on Thursday.The agreement was signed by Heber Biotec (Cuba), of the…See More

Black Panther Movie: Innocent Film or Trojan Horse?

Posted by TheBlackList-Publisher on March 19, 2018 at 10:00amComments 
(ThyBlackMan.com) The Black Panther was a visually stunning film that paid homage to the shared values, traditions and customs of African people. This powerful screenplay was set in the fictitious Kingdom of Wakanda, a completely self-sufficient, politically independent, highly-technological, and scientifically-advanced African nation. This is a concept never before seen in cinema or other Western art forms. Most, if not all other Hollywood movies about the continent…

An overview of Africa’s free trade area dream

Started by TheBlackList-Publisher yesterday.Replies 
African leaders, except for Nigeria and few other countries, have signed an agreement to set up a massive free trade area to improve regional integration and boost economic growth across the…Continue

St Kitts and Nevis Launch New Fund for Citizenship by Investment Programme

The world's first citizenship by investment programme in St Kitts and Nevis has launched a new fund - the Sustainable Growth Fund - to boost investment in the prospering Caribbean nation.

Freedom Rider: Black Panther Movie: A Black Face in a High Place

“Questioners are ‘hoteps’ who are too woke to have fun.”
The desire to see a black face in a high place is a legacy of slavery and the century of Jim Crow segregation that followed. The psychological impact of America’s apartheid is enduring, and…
Continue


Lexus' Genius Product Placement in Marvel's Black Panther Movie Highlights Growing Influence of African Americans' Buying Power

African Americans continue to have a supersized influence on the U.S. economy. By 2020 African Americans are projected to have a buying power of$1.5 trillion with a cumulative growth of 16% and a compound annual growth rate of 3% from 2015-2020, according to market research firm Packaged Facts in the report …
Continue

Black Business Success Model: Countering the Myths of Weaknesses in the Black Business Community

Black business owners are creating businesses at a higher rate than any other demographic, according to FORTUNE.com. The numbers also showed that those businesses had less long-term potential and were less likely to continue…



Kwasi Akyeampong
Editor/Moderator

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Thursday, February 22, 2018

Nielsen Insights Reveal Black Dollars Matter: The Sales Impact of Black Consumers



According to new consumer insights from Nielsen, the global performance management company that provides a comprehensive understanding of what consumers watch, buy and listen to, Black consumers and consumers of color alike are making considerable contributions to the overall market—in some cases representing more than 50% of the overall spending in key product categories.


Black consumers are speaking directly to brands in unprecedented ways and achieving headline-making results. Throughout 2017, popular brands witnessed the power of Black Twitter and the brand impact of socially conscious Black consumers. Through social media, Black consumers have brokered a seat at the table and are demanding that brands and marketers speak to them in ways that resonate culturally and experientially—if these brands want their business. And with African Americans spending $1.2 trillion annually, brands have a lot to lose.
DIVING INTO THE DOLLARS SPENT
Black consumers and consumers of color alike are making considerable contributions to the overall market—in some cases representing more than 50% of the overall spending in key product categories. For example, half of the total spend ($941 million) on dry grains and vegetables in the U.S. in 2017 came from consumers of color. And Black consumers represented $147 million of the total spend in this category, which has recently made advances in product creation to meet the demands of their diverse buyers.
Mainstream manufacturers across other industries are also seizing the opportunity to create specific products that appeal to diverse consumers. Not so surprisingly, African Americans have cornered the ethnic hair and beauty market, ringing up $54 million of the $63 million total industry spend in 2017. But marketers should find it interesting that Black consumers aren’t just spending on products created specifically to appeal to them. In fact, in terms of sheer dollars, African Americans spent considerably more money in the general beauty marketplace last year. Black shoppers spent $473 million in total hair care (a $4.2 billion industry) and made other significant investments in personal appearance products, such as grooming aids ($127 million out of $889 million) and skin care preparations ($465 million out of $3 billion).
African Americans make up 14% of the U.S. population but have outsized influence over spending on essential items such as personal soap and bath needs ($573 million), feminine hygiene products ($54 million) and men’s toiletries ($61 million). Nielsen research also shows Black consumers spent $810 million on bottled water (15% of overall spending) and $587 million on refrigerated drinks (17% of overall spending). Luxury, non-essential products such as women’s fragrances ($151 million of a $679 million industry total), watches and timepieces ($60 million of $385 million in overall spending) and even children’s cologne ($4 million out of $27 million) also play well to an audience that’s keen on image and self care.
“Our research shows that Black consumer choices have a ‘cool factor’ that has created a halo effect, influencing not just consumers of color but the mainstream as well,” said Cheryl Grace, Senior Vice President of U.S. Strategic Community Alliances and Consumer Engagement, Nielsen. “These figures show that investment by multinational conglomerates in R&D to develop products and marketing that appeal to diverse consumers is, indeed, paying off handsomely.”
Companies should take notice of even the subtle shifts in spending, because black consumer brand loyalty is contingent upon a brand’s perception as authentic, culturally relevant, socially conscious and responsible. In fact, 38% of African Americans between the ages of 18 and 34 and 41% of those aged 35 or older say they expect the brands they buy to support social causes, 4% and 15% more than their total population counterparts, respectively. Moreover, Black consumers’ brand preferences are increasingly becoming mainstream choices, which illustrates that the investment in connecting with Black consumers can often yield sizeable general market returns. For instance, sizable Black spend in health and beauty categories has contributed to a diversification of product offerings that appeal not only to Black consumers, but to the general market as well.
WHAT’S AT STAKE?
Black consumers account for a disproportionate amount of product sales in a number of fast-moving consumer goods categories. Again, with $1.2 trillion in spending power, African-American consumers are an important population for smart brands that want to grow market share and brand preference. More importantly, the data suggests that Black consumer spending already significantly affects the bottom line in many categories and industries, and brands can't afford to lose favor or traction with this segment without potential negative impact.
The enormous buying potential of Black consumers has put a spotlight on many popular brands' ability to navigate the nuances of culturally relevant and socially conscious marketing. African Americans are more likely than non-Hispanic white peers to interact with brands on social media or to use social networks to support companies and brands (44% more likely). As the almost nuclear power of social media collides with an increasingly educated, affluent, tech-savvy black consumer base, there's never been a more critical time for companies to build and sustain deeper, more meaningful connections with black consumers—not only to grow their relationships, but to protect them.
“When it comes to African-American consumer spend, there are millions, sometimes billions of dollars in revenue at stake,” said Andrew McCaskill, Senior Vice President, Global Communications and Multicultural Marketing, Nielsen. “With 43% of the 75 million Millennials in the U.S. identifying as African American, Hispanic or Asian, if a brand doesn’t have a multicultural strategy, it doesn’t have a growth strategy. The business case for multicultural outreach is clear. African-American consumers, and all diverse consumers, want to see themselves authentically represented in marketing, and they want brands to recognize their value to the bottomline.”
METHODOLOGY
Insights in this article were derived from Nielsen Homescan, Total U.S., for the 52 weeks ending Dec. 30, 2017.
http://www.nielsen.com
http://www.nielsen.com/africanamericans
Keep the Conversation Going – Follow Nielsen Community on Facebook and Twitter
(PRWEB) FEBRUARY 20, 2018



Saturday, January 20, 2018

OncoSec Provides Encouraging Clinical Observations Related To Triple Negative Breast Cancer Study - with findings related to younger women, African Americans and Hispanics



OncoSec Medical Incorporated ("OncoSec" or the "Company") (NASDAQ: ONCS), a company developing intratumoral cancer immunotherapies, today announced preliminary clinical observations related to its pilot biomarker OMS-I140 clinical trial of ImmunoPulse® IL-12 in patients with metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC). The study is designed to assess whether a single cycle of ImmunoPulse IL-12 increases TNBC tumor immunogenicity by driving a pro-inflammatory cascade of events including activation of cytotoxic tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs).   

To date, five patients with TNBC have been treated with a single cycle of ImmunoPulse IL-12 (intratumoral pIL-12 [tavokinogene telseplasmid or "tavo"] with electroporation). Two of these five patients were subsequently treated with single agent nivolumab (Opdivo®) - an anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor treatment - as their immediate next therapy. Both of these patients, who were heavily pretreated metastatic TNBC patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, experienced robust objective responses in both ImmunoPulse IL-12 treated and untreated lesions. These clinical observations have prompted the Company to further commit to a more definitive evaluation of the combined therapies.
"Metastatic TNBC is a heterogeneous cancer with a poor prognosis where less than five percent of pre-treated patients achieve an objective response to PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint treatments," explained Sharron Gargosky, Chief Clinical and Regulatory Officer of OncoSec. "The marked synergy shown in these patients strongly suggests that IL-12 may have primed the tumor microenvironment, impacting the clinical result. The combination of ImmunoPulse IL-12 and checkpoint inhibition represents a highly promising new therapeutic approach for TNBC and warrants a formal evaluation given the extremely low response rate in women who have failed multiple prior therapies."
Previous studies have demonstrated that breast cancer patients whose tumors are associated with markers of inflammation, such as the presence of TILs, achieve better clinical outcomes. In addition, the density of TILs is a key requirement for the anti-tumor activity of immune checkpoint inhibitors like anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies. By augmenting the expansion of CD8+ tumor infilatrating T cells, ImmunoPulse IL-12 may be an ideal candidate to combine with checkpoint inhibitors, which has demonstrated low and variable activity as a monotherapy in TNBC.
Immunological examination of samples from all patients are currently being analyzed. These data, along with the full information regarding clinical observations and safety data, will be submitted for presentation at an upcoming medical meeting in 2018.
To learn more about the trial, visit www.oncosec.com. Additional details can also be found atwww.clinicaltrials.gov via NCT02531425.
OPDIVO® is a registered trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company.
ImmunoPulse® is a registered trademark of OncoSec Medical Incorporated, San Diego, CA, USA.
About Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC)
Breast cancer cells that test negative for estrogen receptors (ER-), progesterone receptors (PR-), and HER2 (HER2-) means the cancer is triple negative.1 Approximately 15-20 percent of US breast cancer cases are triple negative breast cancer (TNBC),2 which disproportionately affects younger women as well as African-American women, followed by Hispanic women.3
CONTINUE FOR MORE