Monday, April 30, 2018

"A Reason For Living": An explosive historical novel set in Jamaica, of love sex culture and revolution


In the 1960s, the little country of Jamaica gained independence from England, and begun discarding over 400 years of Spanish and British domination, racism and classism; and unleashing some of the greatest creative talents in music, sports, dance, and intellectual applications.

Julian Jingles, rude boy writer, working at the at Gleaner Company in Kingston, Jamaica circa 1970, two years after writing his novel.


A Reason For Living, a first novel written mostly between 1966 to 1968, by teenage Jamaican writer, Julian Jingles, captures this unique period in Jamaica's history. He has established careers, spanning five decades, as a journalist, documentary filmmaker, and entrepreneur, in America and Jamaica.
Jamaica's cultural genius has given the world five genres of popular music; Ska, Rocksteady, Reggae, Dub, and Dancehall. Talented personalities emerged mainly in sports and music to garner world attention, such as George Kerr, Collie Smith, Lenox "Billy" Miller, Allan "Skill" Cole, Donald Quarrie, Merlene Ottey, Harry Belafonte, Millie Small, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Toots and the Maytals, Jimmy Cliff, The Skatalites, Monty Alexander, Rico Rodriguez, Ernest Ranglin, Clement "Coxsone" Dodd, Cecil "Prince Buster" Campbell, Arthur "Duke" Reid, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Chris Blackwell, Rex Nettleford, Madge Sinclair, and in international politics Michael Manley, and many others.
But alongside these achievements existed deep, widespread social and economic discontent, fueling violence; pitting segments of the suffering masses against each other, ignorantly and arrogantly perpetrating partisan politics, and vying criminals against the police.  
The novel profoundly captures these troubled but phenomenally creative times, when the "rude boys" emerged, expressing anti-state, anti-social,  rebellious lifestyles, identifiable with young males living throughout the capital city Kingston. Gangs namely Phantom, Mau Mau, Pigeon, Skull, Spanglers, Idaho, Untouchables, Spoilers, Vikings, Hot Steppers, Shower Posse, and Phoenix drove fear into many Kingstonians, battling each other, protecting turfs and invading others.
A Reason For Living delves into love, sex, music and sports, and the roles of Rastafari, and the American Civil Rights and Black Power movements that impacted Jamaica. It tells the story of a physically beautiful country, of warm, humorous, enterprising, and crafty people with the urge to succeed, fighting against inequality, injustice, prejudice, and discrimination. It's the story of a revolution that could have happened in Jamaica. Every page grabs you.
Available at amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com, iUniverse.com, and bookstores.

SOURCE Julian Jingles





NEW YORK, Jan. 24, 2018 /PRNewswire/ --






Saturday, April 28, 2018

The GroovaLottos Form Down Streeters, LLC Offering Artist Development Services

Members of Grammy nominated band and self-contained songwriting and production unit,

The GroovaLottos have formed a company for artist development, and production services.
Labels, managers and artists looking to take their careers to the next level now have an option for a high quality product by working with Down Streeters, LLC. The company, formed by Eddie Ray Johnson and Mwalim DaPhunkee Professor of The GroovaLottos offer music production services in the all genres of rock, soul, hip-hop, blues, jazz and funk. With over 70 combined years of experiences in all genres of music, Down Streeters, LLC is a powerhouse for the music industry.

Receiving 4 Grammy nominations for their debut album, "Ask Yo' Mama" where Mwalim and Eddie Ray served as producers, as well as international attention for their production work on the Soul Poet's Syndicate single "Flippin", which included 5 remixes, they are opening up their services to independent artists, labels and management companies in need of artist development services.

"There are so many talented young artists in need of direction; as well as seasoned artists in need of an updated mature sound. We've got something for all of them to shine," explained Eddie Ray Johnson. Artist Development services include vocal coaching, song development, production services, and performance development.

Artists currently on their roster include soul-funk-blues band, The GroovaLottos; Hip-hop Jazz artist, The ZYG 808; soul singer and songwriter, Phillip Aaron; and soul singer, Anamuna.

For more info, visit:
https://www.thegroovalottos.com/down-streeters/




Black Activists: Starbucks Shutdown Prompts Concern That "Racial Bias Training" Programs Actually Violate Civil Rights


Black Activists Want Government to Investigate Employer-Mandated "Implicit Bias" Workshops.

Posted by TheBlackList-Publisher  April 26, 2018 at 9:24am View Blog

Starbucks Shutdown Prompts Concern That "Racial Bias Training" Programs Actually Violate Civil Rights.

Non-Minority and Male Employees Could Be Disadvantaged.

Washington, DC - With the Starbucks chain of coffeehouses planning to shutter over 8,000 locations on May 29 to train approximately 175,000 members of its workforce on issues of alleged "implicit bias" and "promot[ing] conscious inclusion," the Project 21 black leadership network has asked the federal government to look into whether blanket assumptions by an employer in such situations constitute a violation of employees' civil rights.

"Not only does implicit bias training on the part of employers eat up valuable time that could be spent training employees on safety, teamwork and building morale, the targeting associated with bias training is divisive," said Project 21 Co-Chairman Stacy Washington. "When employees are trained to focus on their differences, the camaraderie necessary to work together is destroyed. Mistrust in fellow coworkers is sown, and those the training is intended to help are actually harmed in the long run. Employees should not be forced to utilize methods that have no track record of success."

On April 23, Project 21 Co-Chairman Horace Cooper signed letters that were sent to Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division Joh... at the U.S. Department of Justice and Acting Chairman Victoria Lipnic of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The letters questioned the "troubling" implications of "workplace practices focusing on 'implicit' or 'unconscious' bias." In particular, Project 21 asked if such behavior violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This provision prohibits discrimination based on sex, race, color, national origin and religion. 

The letter noted:

Employers are increasingly adopting so-called "implicit bias" training, which targets employees by race or gender. Not only are the tests associated with unconscious bias well short of meeting scientific standards, but – because they purport to aid employers in targeting employees primarily based on their race or ethnicity and/or their gender – they potentially allow employees to be assessed, disciplined or promoted on the basis of race or gender activity which Title VII specifically bars. Whether based on good intentions or not, an employer's plan to hire, promote or advance employees who are minority and/or female using implicit bias as a motive disadvantages non-minority and male employees.

The letter further stated that Project 21 "believe[s] that this employment technique is a violation" of civil rights law, and that the federal government has cause to investigate if "implicit bias" programs conflict with Title VII protections. CONTINUE FOR MORE



Sunday, April 1, 2018

Take A Stand Against Amputation: Raising Awareness About a Potentially Life-Threatening Disease With Worse Outcomes for Minorities


Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is the biggest disease that most people have never heard about. Up to a staggering 18 million Americans1 suffer from PAD, a potentially life-threatening disease. Early detection is key to treating this condition where plaque builds up along blood vessel walls, narrowing the arteries and reducing blood flow to the legs and feet.
There are more than 160,000 PAD-related amputations in the U.S. each year, so when left untreated, PAD can lead to amputation.2 And the rate of amputation for African-American and Hispanic-Americans with PAD is higher than for white Americans.
  •     African-Americans are twice as likely to be amputated as a result of advanced PAD as Caucasians.3
  •     Hispanics receive an amputation for PAD at a rate 50 percent higher than Caucasians.3